logo design

Logos with a Stench of Ripoffery

Logos with a Stench of Ripoffery

It's a sad day indeed when individuals purloin the hard work of others and present it as their own work.Call it desperation, a lack of pride, or cases of shameless hackery on parade – but the net result is the same: Representing another's work as your own. For shame, I say. Why did you get into this line of work to begin with if not for the satisfaction of work well done? It kind of makes one's skin crawl a little, but now, without further ado, shameful logo rip-offings, courtesy of the logo rip off catchers at Logothief.com. It was noble of the offending sushi bar designer to white out some details in the sushi bar design they ripped off. The logo is testimony to the lack of freshness in the place, however.  There's just no way in heck that two people pull this visual image out of the atmosphere. Sometimes great minds do think alike, but this ain't one […]

Corporate Logo Changes For 2014, Part 2

Corporate Logo Changes For 2014, Part 2

We really left the most exciting changes for last. Just kidding. University of Illinois. The fighting Illini. A program which shows its face in the Rose Bowl every 50 years or so, has eliminated its own state from its logo and gone for a classic block "I". Not exactly original in the world of college athletics, but it does look classier. And who knows? Perhaps a winning season is in the offing.   The Tampa Bay Buccaneers have themselves a sporty new logo. Well, not new exactly so much as a new illustration. But it's pretty dang good. Greg Schiano may have gotten the old heave-ho, but the 'eers are heading into the future with a snazzy and simplified logo.   Reebok had kind of a dumb-looking logo to begin with, so the fact they've modernized and simplified things a bit would normally be an improvement. But the fact that a shoe and sportswear manufacturer's logo now looks like that […]

Corporate Logo Changes For 2014, Part 1

Corporate Logo Changes For 2014, Part 1

As always, there are a gaggle of companies who felt the urgent need to make their logos fit into what they perceive to be the current landscape, if you will. Some are stunning improvements, while others fall under the category of no one cares but the company itself.  But nothing scares the bejesus out of businesses like change does, so I suppose that they all should be applauded for putting on their big boy pants and doing a little bit of it. Olive Garden made a drastic change to their logo. Can't say that it's a bad thing as their old one seemed like the kind of craptastic fake sign that you'd pick up for $4.99 in the bargain bin at a Marshalls. Their new one isn't exactly a textbook display of design prowess, but is simple and basic. If only Olive Garden could similarly tweak their menu and add a heaping helping of culinary competence.   Bacardi's former logo […]

New Logos, New Print Design…

New Logos, New Print Design…

…are we headed for a new, web-wide world? There seems to be little point in fighting it. Every day, web design and print design are coming closer together. Elements are jumping the fence, experts in one field are being asked to design for the other, and any printer or advertiser claiming to provide a 'complete' service has to create collateral that transfers effectively over both media. And perhaps this Vulcan-esque design meld is never more obvious than when we look at logos. A recent feature in The New York Times points out that many major brands are redesigning their logos in favor of a “friendlier, more approachable” style. As author Bill Marsh suggests, colors are getting lighter, edges are getting rounder, and warm, gentle touches of sparks and greenery are replacing harsh power-symbolism. Huge brands like Wal-Mart, Kraft, Packard-Bell, and Target are making the change. Why? According to Marsh, it's because the recession is the key issue of 2009, much […]

Conservatives Commentators Challenge Google Logo Design

Design 10.10.2007
Conservatives Commentators Challenge Google Logo Design

Logo controversy impacts the entire design community. Where would we, as a design community, and particularly as a design blogging community, be without the fascinating and time-consuming pursuit of logo controversy? In recent years, it has become impossible to unveil a new logo, particularly for a high profile event like, hmm, say, the Olympics, without drawing the ire of graphic designs and social/political critics alike. Even the seemingly benign doodles that occasionally grace the Google homepage have come under fire. Conservative critics have long been irked by the uber liberal company's failure to commemorate Memorial Day or Veteran's Day with a specialized homepage logo, and apparently, the situation is just getting worse. Last week, Google tweaked its logo to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Sputnik launch. A nice little design, from my perspective, but for some, the little satellite whizzing through cyberspace is a slap in the face. Why, they ask, would Google honor the achievement of a country […]

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